Category Archives: SochuaNews

MP Mu Sochua, to attend Global Ambassador’s Program in Haiti

February 23, 2012

photograph by Cattleya Jaruthavee

On February 28 to March 1, 2012 Cambodian Member of Parliament Mu Sochua will act as a Global Ambassador for the launch of the Vital Voices and Bank of America global mentoring program “The Global Ambassador’s Program” in Pétion-Ville, Haiti. The program seeks to resolve the women’s leadership gap by connecting the expertise of the world’s top women from business, media, government and civil society to outstanding emerging local women leaders. The 2012 program’s Global Ambassadors include: American actress and activist Maria Bello; Minister of Agriculture in the Republic of Liberia, Dr. Florence Chenoweth; a Marketing Executive at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch; and Constance Morella, the former United States Government Ambassador to the OECD.

Haitian women’s voices are barely present in the country’s social and economic decision making processes. Currently, women make up less than 3% of Haiti’s Parliament. As a result, throughout the course of the past few months, Haitian women’s organizations have hosted 308 focus groups for women across the country to identify and develop policy platforms regarding key issues affecting Haitian women. The Global Ambassador’s Program will provide a space for local leaders to meet, consult, and develop their policy platforms under the mentorship of the Global Ambassadors.

During the program, Haitian women leaders will draft a set of policy priorities based on the issues identified by Haitian women across the country. Each Global Ambassador, including MP Mu Sochua, will mentor two extraordinary Haitian women leaders as they lead this consultative process to produce a National Women’s Platform. On March 1, the National Women’s Platform will be presented to President Michel Martelly to ensure the acknowledged policy priorities are accounted for in the next legislative cycle.

For more information regarding The Global Ambassador’s Program and Global Ambassador MP Mu Sochua, visit: sochua.wordpress.com.

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Mu Sochua holds press conference outside parliament today

I am calling on the government to give priority to people living with HIV/AIDS to have housing in Borei Keila.

Orphans with HIV are left in the care of their grand-parents and now brutally forced out of their homes.

Cambodian Red Cross recieves support from the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation but has yet to come to visit the victims.

Attended a Human Rights forum in Battambang

In 1997, over 10,000 hectare of the forest in the district of Koh Kralor were given to Khmer Rouge army officers and leaders in exchange for their re-integration and to stop the armed conflict.

The remaining 3,800 hectares of the forest were reserved for social concessions. 

Throughout the years, the former KR officers and leaders have sold part of the 3,800 hectares that are state land. In the meantime, villagers from the neighboring commune have cleared the remaining forest for farming.

The sale of the state land continues till today with the help of the commune chief, the village chief, and other former KR leaders with protection from police and the court. Villagers who have cleared the forest for farming are threatened, their crops destroyed and face arrest and detention.

I have intervened and rescued many villagers, including children who are arrested and detained. Villagers live in fear of arrest.

My question: why are local authorities allowing and are part of the sale of state land?

My solution: the committee in charge of land management should register villagers with no land and provide them land equally and with transparency, to end the dispute. 

My recommendation to the people: vote for a commune chief who will defend your land and not for a candidate who will sell your land.

A day after the forum took place, a woman is accused of stealing some type of farming equipment. The commune police are threatening with arrest. 

This is a threat and a message to villagers to not speak up against the local authorities.

PUBLIC INVITATION TO MEET MU SOCHUA IN MONTREAL, CANADA

July 31, 2011

Dear Compatriots,

We are very pleased to invite you, family and friends to a public gathering which will be held in honour of our elected member of Cambodian parliament, Ms. Mu Sochua. A former Minister of Women’s Affairs and

a leading human rights activist, MP Mu has been a defending champion of Cambodian women’s rights and dignity. She has been inspirational in her fearless journey to empower Cambodian women, promote and defend their rights and dignity.

This public gathering will be held on SUNDAY, August 7, 2011, from 2:00pm – 9:00pm, at Centre de Loisir located on 1375 rue Grenet, Ville Saint Laurent, Quebec, Canada.

For detail information and contact info., please CLICK HERE

Your supports and encouragement is vital to the cause of advancing Cambodian women’s rights and dignity inside our native land. Hope to see you all there.

Truly Yours,

Pretty Ma, SG

Sam Rainsy Party of North America
450-712 4998

Contact Info.
Mr. Pang Heng 450-934 3873
Mr. Chuop Samnang 514-543 1479
Mr. Tep Sokhavouth 514-678 8583

Blood Sugar – Made in Cambodia

From land owners, our villagers are now daily laborers. From proud farmers to landlessness. Development is not a good reason when there is gap in distribution of wealth. How many people are employed by these companies?

The King of Koh Kong speaks out | National news | The Phnom Penh Post
www.phnompenhpost.com

Mu Sochua, MP

“I do not fear death; I fear political silence against injustices”
-Malalai Joya, MP Afghanistan

Donate to Mu Sochua’s Justice Fund

Free and fair elections-Reforms Needed in Cambodia

Mu Sochua Interview with Radio Free Asia/ 14 July, 2011, in Khmer.

http://www.rfa.org/khmer/indepth/interview_musochua-07132011033659.html

Radio Free Asia: Has there been any reforms of the electoral process?

Mu Sochua: yes, but minor reforms.

RFA: If Mr. Sam Rainsy is prevented from returning to Cambodia, will the party look for a substitute?

MS: It is out of the question. The real problem is electoral reforms. Mr. Sam Rainsy is a victim of political persecution. If his legal records are not cleared, his does not have a chance to stand as a candidate for election. I am also a victim of this political persecution. Does it mean that I also have to be replaced as a candidate? it is not for the victim for find solution. It is for reforms to happen in order for free and fair elections to be guaranteed.

RFA: What is SRP strategy for the return of Mr. Sam Rainsy?

MS: the party is calling on the signatories of the Paris Peace Accords to reconvene and to review the conditions put forward in the 1991 Paris Peace Accords. Free and fair election, non-violence, democracy, these are all part of the accords. Freedom of speech and freedom of expression must be upheld, that is part of the accords.

RFA: Is mass demonstration – Malaysia style something SRP is considering despite recent government crackdowns?

MS: We are not at mass demonstration yet. We hope to have all stakeholders come together to find solutions. We do not see this as just SRP responsibility. We, as Cambodians must share the same task to push for electoral reforms. We call on all Cambodian citizens to defend their fundamental right: the right to vote. Demonstrations are our rights that we can exercise.

RFA: If Mr. Sam Rainsy can not return, will SRP consider a mass demonstration?

MS: there is no “f”. For election to be called free and fair, Mr. Sam Rainsy must return. Mass demonstration is one of the solutions.

A HARD ROAD TO DEMOCRACY

Analysis: A hard road to democracy

Monday, 11 July 2011 15:00

Mu Sochua

The Phnom Penh Post

Prime Minister Francois Fillon of France granted an exclusive interview to The Phnom Penh Post on the eve of his two-day visit to Cambodia last month.

Fillon was totally correct to remind Cambodia that democratic institutions must benefit everyone. They are essential pillars of democracy.

The challenge of building these institutions begins with the political will of leaders who have been chosen by their people to lead.

Most important of all, the true challenge is the commitment to an inclusive system of governance and mechanisms that allows voices to be heard and differences of opinion to be brought to the attention of those in charge.

Judging by these basic principles of democracy, Cambodia has a long way to go. It begins with the practice of winner takes all at the National Assembly.

Since the 2008 general election which European Union observers rated as far below international standards the Cambodian Peoples Party has controlled 90 of the 123 seats.

During each parliamentary debate, senior CPP members of parliament refer to themselves as: we, the 90 seats and remind other elected representatives that the people of Cambodia have given them the power to lead the country.

They truly believe it is their full right to conduct business without any obligation to include the opposition, unless for ceremonial reasons. Such a mindset is a serious barrier to democratisation.

Democratic institutions must be sustained by public officials and civil servants whose expertise, experience and knowledge ensure that services to the people are rendered equally and without political interference. Elected leaders and public civil servants have one thing in common: the obligation to maintain a high sense of ethics.

This is another challenge to democratisation: the heavy and active presence of judges and court officials who are members of the central committee of the ruling party.

Like civil servants in all other public institutions, court officials must pledge their allegiance to the CPP.

Every weekend, officials from each ministry and department join CPP working groups to pay visits to the grassroots, using state resources and often with gifts for the rural poor. This system of patronage is totally contrary to a strict code of conduct and respect for ethics.

In the past 20 years, Lithuania, a small country that spent 50 years under a Soviet regime, has built strong democratic roots, a striving civil society and a vibrant multi-party system.

The president of the Lithuanian parliament is a woman, and the first vice-president is a woman from the opposition party.

The parliamentary commissions on finance and audit are reserved for the opposition for check and balance, and the opposition leader is first to have the floor during debates.

Where is the hope for democratisation in Cambodia? That light of hope shines each time our villagers stand up to defy arrests.

Networks of the opposition are tightly woven in the countryside, despite the absence of their leader. Workers have called out for general strikes for better wages.

Women take an active part in that grassroots movement.

The women of Beoung Kak lake who were re-arrested last Thursday are part of the hope, and their fearless fight for dignity is joined by other victims of injustice throughout Cambodia.

The only way to stop those people fighting for justice is for the ruling party to realise that sharing power is a must.

And it must begin with dialogue and with the recognition of peoples rights and freedom.

Oppressive regimes will always come to an end. The world movement for change has proven so.

More than 1,400 opposition members were arrested at the weekend in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Is this a sign of an Asian storm coming?